Ian Dryden is a Professor of Statistics in the School of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Nottingham.

My broad research interests concern the development of generic statistical methodology motivated by important real-world applications. I am particularly interested in geometrical problems, for example the statistical analysis of the shapes of objects. Such data are routinely available in a very wide variety of settings, from the smallest scale of atoms and molecules in chemistry, to the study of complex organisms in biology and medicine.

Centre Research | Virtual Root

Ian Dryden's homepage

Nicola Everitt is Associate Professor of Materials Engineering at the University of Nottingham and Director of the Engineering Domain of the CPIB virtual root project.

Her fields of expertise lie in structure/property relationships for high performance materials. Her main focus is on mechanical property evaluation of small samples, from biological tissue such a plant roots and germinating seeds, to biomedical materials such as degradable polymer scaffolds and bone, to thin hard films and stiff fibres. She has a broad knowledge of materials analysis techniques including optical and electron microscopy and many types of mechanical testing. She has particular interest and expertise in nano-indentation testing, and dynamic materials analysis i.e. the behaviour of materials at different rates of loading or strain at different temperatures.

Centre Research | FUTUREROOTS: Redesigning Root Architecture for Improved Crop Performance | Lateral Root Emergence | vSeed | Virtual Root

Nicola Everitt's homepage

Mike Holdsworth is Professor of Crop Science and Director of Crop Sciences at the University of Nottingham. He is the Manager of Strand 1 of the CPIB virtual root project and Project Leader for the vSEED project.

  • Current research programmes, recent publications etc are available on the Portal for the laboratory of Professor Holdsworth
  • The web page for the ERANET-PG funded vSEED consortium

Research programmes focus on:

  • Understanding the control of seed germination and seedling establishment.
  • The function of the hormone Abscisic Acid (ABA), and plant responses to abiotic stress.
  • Systems approaches, integrating genetics, post-genomics, physiology, mathematics, computer science and engineering, are being used to understand and manipulate plant development and environmental responses.
  • Emphasis is placed on the transfer of molecular genetic information from studies in model species such as Arabidopsis and rice, to address important agricultural problems associated with plant developmental biology and response to abiotic stress.

Centre Research | vSeed | Virtual Root

Mike Holdsworth's homepage

Ian is Professor of Cereal Genomics in the School of Biosciences

Centre Research | FUTUREROOTS: Redesigning Root Architecture for Improved Crop Performance

Ian King's homepage

Professor John King is Deputy Head of the School of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Nottingham and is the Director of Modelling within the CPIB virtual root project.

Centre Research | Integrative approaches to understanding and improving nutrient uptake efficiencies of crop species | FUTUREROOTS: Redesigning Root Architecture for Improved Crop Performance | Systems analysis of networks for pollen development | Lateral Root Emergence | vSeed | Virtual Root

John King's homepage

Julie is a Lecturer in the Division of Plant and Crop Sciences in the School of Biosciences

Centre Research | FUTUREROOTS: Redesigning Root Architecture for Improved Crop Performance

Julie King's homepage

Chungui is a Lecturer in Post-genomics in the School of Biosciences

Centre Research | Integrative approaches to understanding and improving nutrient uptake efficiencies of crop species

Chungui Lu's homepage

Sean is Associate Professor in Crop Genetics in the School of Biosciences

Centre Research | FUTUREROOTS: Redesigning Root Architecture for Improved Crop Performance

Sean Mayes's homepage

Erik is Lecturer in Crop Physiology in the School of Biosciences

Centre Research | 3D Canopy Architecture Modelling

Erik Murchie's homepage

Markus Owen is Professor of Mathematical Biology at the University of Nottingham.

Markus’ research lies in the application of nonlinear and multiscale mathematical models to cell biology, in particular to plant and animal developmental biology, cancer and neuroscience. He uses a variety of mathematical and computational approaches, including local and spatially extended systems of differential equations, integral equations, individual-based models (IBMs), and multiscale models which combine two or more of these ingredients. This work is underpinned by multidisciplinary collaborations with life scientists, engineers, computer scientists and other mathematicians, both at Nottingham and further afield. Markus is director of the Centre for Mathematical Medicine and Biology (CMMB) at the University of Nottingham, and plays a central role within CPIB, supervising research on cell signalling pathways (such as auxin and GA perception) and catalysing developments in multicellular modelling. In 2009, MRO was awarded a prestigious Whitehead Prize by the London Mathematical Society, for his contributions to the development of multiscale modelling approaches in systems medicine and biology.

 

Centre Research | Root SAT-NAV: uncovering the molecular mechanisms guiding root angle in soil | FUTUREROOTS: Redesigning Root Architecture for Improved Crop Performance | Regulatory networks for asymmetric cell division | Virtual Root

Markus Owen's homepage

Jerry is Professor of Plant Biology and Dean of the Graduate School

Centre Research | Root SAT-NAV: uncovering the molecular mechanisms guiding root angle in soil | Lateral Root Emergence

Jerry Roberts's homepage

Graham Seymour is Professor of Plant Biotechnology at the University of Nottingham. My research interests are the control of ripening in fleshy fruits. In my lab we use tomato as a model system to understand how processes such as texture and flavour are regulated.

Centre Research | Network analysis and QTL mapping of tomato fruit quality traits | Identifying genes and metabolites that influence tomato quality | A Systems Approach to Tomato Ripening

Graham Seymour's homepage

Ranjan Swarup is a Lecturer in the School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham.

Centre Research | Virtual Root

Ranjan Swarup's homepage