Modelling the formation of diffraction gratings on top of iridescent petal epidermis

Rea L. Antoniou Kourounioti, Leah R. Band, John A. Fozard, Beverley J. Glover, Anthony Hampstead, Oliver E. Jensen, Anna Lovrics, Nathan Mellor, Edwige Moyroud & Silvia Vignolini

Pigments account for most of the colours widespread in nature, however the strongest and brightest colours arise from physical structures, made of transparent material. These ‘structural colours’ are much more intense and pure than chemical colours and they are commonly associated with iridescence, i.e. the colour changes when an object is viewed from different angles. Animals often use structural colour to create vivid effects: peacocks, butterflies and iridescent jewel beetles owe their stunning colours to the manipulation of light by minute structures periodically organized on or just below their surfaces.

Rea L. Antoniou Kourounioti, Leah R. Band, John A. Fozard, Beverley J. Glover, Anthony Hampstead, Oliver E. Jensen, Anna Lovrics, Nathan Mellor, Edwige Moyroud & Silvia Vignolini

Proceedings of the 5th Mathematics in the Plant Sciences Study Group